3rd Annual Data Privacy Conference USA

#DataUSA21

Forum Global's Data Privacy Conference USA is back and in person this fall

This conference will be held under a Hybrid Format. To ensure the health and safety of our speakers, attendees, sponsors and staff while maximising interaction amongst participants, in-person attendance at this event will be limited to 120 attendees.

There will be a significant in-person component to this event with demand likely to be high. If you are interested in participating in the conference in person we recommend that you apply for your spot as soon as possible. For those not attending on site, sessions will be live streamed to our events platform.

We will continue to monitor developments around the COVID-19 pandemic, follow recommendations regarding masks, social distancing, and sanitation set out by the venue and local authorities and may revise the capacity limit based on the advice received.

This conference will be held under a Hybrid Format. To ensure the health and safety of our speakers, attendees, sponsors and staff while maximising interaction amongst participants, in-person attendance at this event will be limited to 120 attendees.

There will be a significant in-person component to this event with demand likely to be high. If you are interested in participating in the conference in person we recommend that you apply for your spot as soon as possible. For those not attending on site, sessions will be live streamed to our events platform.

We will continue to monitor developments around the COVID-19 pandemic, follow recommendations regarding masks, social distancing, and sanitation set out by the venue and local authorities and may revise the capacity limit based on the advice received.

Event Overview

The 3rd Annual Data Privacy Conference USA will take place on September 29th 2021 in a hybrid format and gather thought leaders, legislators, the public and private sectors, and civil society representatives to discuss the most topical and timely issues relating Data Privacy in the US.

Participants will explore the extent to which a strong comprehensive Data Privacy federal framework in the US is realistically achievable after years of repeated efforts to reach a consensus, and discuss latest initiatives to boost transatlantic cooperation on digital regulations through the EU-US Trade and Technology Council, starting with a new EU-US privacy agreement. The conference will also highlight privacy issues around Artificial Intelligence developments worldwide, while significant focus will also be given to the privacy challenges raised by behavioural advertising, the major changes led by ‘Big Tech’ in this area and the impact these changes could have on competition, on future revenue streams and business models

Don’t miss the opportunity to join the debate with privacy experts – registration is now open, and FREE OF CHARGE for both in person and virtual attendees.

The 3rd Annual Data Privacy Conference

Key Themes

Federal privacy law

The push for a Federal privacy law

Transatlantic relationship

Data Privacy and the EU-U.S. Trade & Technology Council for a renewed transatlantic relationship

AI

Artificial Intelligence, Privacy and Civil Rights

Advertising

Behavioural Advertising and consumers’ protection

Antitrust

The interrelation between Data Privacy and Antitrust

Event Overview

The 3rd Annual Data Privacy Conference


The 3rd Annual Data Privacy Conference USA will take place on September 29th 2021 in a hybrid format and gather thought leaders, legislators, the public and private sectors, and civil society representatives to discuss the most topical and timely issues relating Data Privacy in the US.

Participants will explore the extent to which a strong comprehensive Data Privacy federal framework in the US is realistically achievable after years of repeated efforts to reach a consensus, discuss latest initiatives to boost transatlantic cooperation on digital regulations through the EU-US Trade and Technology Council, starting with a new EU-US privacy agreement. The conference will also highlight privacy issues around Artificial Intelligence developments worldwide ,while significant focus will also be given to the privacy challenges raised by behavioural advertising, the major changes led by ‘Big Tech’ in this area and the impact these changes could have on competition, on future revenue streams and business models.

Don’t miss the opportunity to join the debate with privacy experts – registration is now open, and FREE OF CHARGE for both in person and virtual attendees.

Key Themes

Federal privacy law

The push for a Federal privacy law

Transatlantic relationship

Data Privacy and the EU-U.S. Trade & Technology Council for a renewed transatlantic relationship

AI

Artificial Intelligence, Privacy and Civil Rights

Advertising

Behavioural Advertising and consumers’ protection

Antitrust

The interrelation between Data Privacy and Antitrust

Speakers:

Didier Reynders

Didier Reynders

Commissioner for Justice
European Commission

Lourdes M. Turrecha

Lourdes M. Turrecha

Founder
The Rise of Privacy Tech

Katitza Rodriguez

Katitza Rodriguez

Policy Director for Global Privacy
EFF

Paula Bruening

Paula Bruening

Founder and Principal
Casentino Strategies LLC

Jessica Rich 240

Jessica Rich

Distinguished Fellow, Georgetown Institute for Technology Law and Policy
Georgetown University Law Centern

Christine Bannan 240

Christine Bannan

Policy Counsel
Open Technology Institute, New America

Agenda

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, discussions around data privacy at the federal level was gaining momentum due to increasing concerns over the collection and use of personal information and public mistrust towards digital technologies. However, despite the introduction of an unprecedented number of data privacy bills in Congress and amid an increasing trend of state legislatures being introduced around the country, progress around the enactment of a comprehensive federal law protecting personal information remains at standstill. As the pandemic subsidies, these state-level efforts are ramping-up, while the new administration is expected to leverage its control of the White House and majority in Congress to make significant progress on the enactment of a strong comprehensive federal data privacy framework. Meanwhile, industry is also stepping up to address these issues by rolling out their own privacy updates, becoming a leading force of change in the area of privacy and the overall digital landscape.

In this context, Forum Global’s 3rd Annual Data Privacy Conference USA will gather thought leaders, legislators, the public and private sectors, and civil society representatives to explore the latest in the push for a set of federal privacy rules, the extent to which a comprehensive framework is realistically achievable after years of repeated efforts, and the possible ramifications for citizens, SMBs, enforcement authorities and the tech industry should a consensus not be reached soon. It will discuss the major implications these issues could have on other top priorities for the Biden administration in the digital and privacy realms, including on the efforts to boost transatlantic cooperation on digital regulations, starting with a new EU-US privacy agreement, as well as initiatives to ensure that the US remains the global leader in AI developments. Significant focus will also be given to major privacy changes led by “digital giants” in the AdTech sector which could impact existing revenue streams and business models and revolutionize the digital ecosystem that we know today.

*** Times are listed in ET ***

Data Privacy Conference
2021-09-29
08:30 - 08:55
Opening of Event & Networking
08:55 - 09:00
Welcome by Forum Global
09:00 - 10:30
Opening Session: Enacting a US Federal Privacy Law: what will break the deadlock? What if the deadlock cannot be broken?

Despite numerous and repeated efforts to pass a comprehensive federal privacy law during the 116th Congress, all proposed bills failed to secure enough traction, mostly due to partisan disagreements over key sticking points such as private right of actions and pre-emption. While more bills are now being introduced in Congress, privacy legislation is continuing to proliferate at state level fueling concerns over an expanding patchwork of conflicting state laws that will be difficult to interpret and navigate for both businesses and consumers. Alongside this, industry has taken further action to self-regulate in the past few months, with tech giants rolling out privacy-focused updates to their products and services, leading some to believe that privacy enforcement may ultimately be driven by industry and not by regulators or privacy watchdogs in the short to medium term, raising concerns around handing these responsibilities to privately held companies. Meanwhile the FTC is also considering a launch of Mag-Moss giving them rulemaking authority and has recently voted to change its approach to prescribing new rules for unfair or deceptive business practices under Section 18 of the FTC Act. This session will discuss where concrete progress on setting harmonized privacy rules in the US can soon be expected from and the implications for industry, consumers and enforcement authorities.

With the White House and the 117th Congress controlled by the same party, will the Biden Administration and Democrats in both chambers leverage this opportunity and pass a federal privacy law? What will be needed to break the impasse on pre-emption and private right of action in order to guarantee bipartisan support given the Democrat’s tenuous majority in Congress? Will pressure on Congress continue to come from the growing wave of comprehensive state privacy laws and challenges brought by a patchwork of different rules? With states efforts intensifying to enact their own privacy rules, what can be learnt from California’s experience in passing and enforcing the CCPA and updating it to the CPRA, from Virginia’s and Colorado recent enactment of the CDPA and CPA, but also from the bills that have been introduced but failed to pass in other states, like in Washington and Florida recently? To what extent can the FTC break the logjam with privacy rulemaking under the Magnuson-Moss authority, and, how could FTC’s enforcement efforts in the consumer privacy area be strengthened via the changes made on rules for unfair or deceptive business practices under Section 18 of the FTC Act? What does all of this mean for businesses of all sizes and sectors and what is being done to minimize compliance challenges, especially for small businesses? To what extent will the self-regulatory initiatives by industry lead to a fundamental reshaping of the thinking around data privacy and consumer protection in the US?

Opening Session: Enacting a US Federal Privacy Law: what will break the deadlock? What  if the deadlock cannot be broken? image
Jessica Rich
Distinguished Fellow, Georgetown Institute for Technology Law and Policy, Georgetown University Law Center
Part 1: Keynote Speeches
Part 2: Reactions & Panel Discussion
10:30 - 10:45
Coffee Break
10:45 - 12:10
Session 2: Achieving an interoperable privacy mechanism for a renewed transatlantic digital relationship

Fourteen months (*at time of the conference) after the CJEU decision invalidating the Privacy Shield framework in the “Schrems II” case and at a time where many argue that international data flows will be the main engine of the global economic recovery post pandemic, uncertainties remain regarding the future of data transfers between the US and the EU, and the implications of the ruling for the future of the transatlantic relationship as a whole. Despite positive steps to resolve outstanding issues – such as the recent publication of updated SCCs by the European Commission, the release of the EDPB finalized version of the Recommendations on supplementary measures, the intensifying of negotiations for an enhanced EU-U.S. Privacy Shield framework by the U.S. Government and the European Commission and the launch of the EU-U.S. Trade and Technology Council to coordinate their approaches to key tech, trade and economic issues – urgent work is needed to overcome the remaining roadblocks for the development of a new data-transfer mechanism on which a cooperative and stable transatlantic relationship on digital policy can be built. This session will discuss what is needed so that the new Administration can work effectively with EU officials to establish a clear, consistent and robust replacement mechanism for data transfers which appropriately addressed the concerns around national security agencies access to Europeans’ personal information via bulk data collection practices. Focus will be given to the core privacy principles and values that the US and the EU share, to the main persisting differences between the existing approaches, and how these can be best addressed to achieve greater compatibility between their frameworks, ensure the long-term stability of transatlantic data flows, facilitate global trade and
support innovation.

What impact has the invalidation of the Privacy Shield had on businesses from all sectors, especially on SMBs, on both side of the Atlantic and what is being done to address the compliance challenges faced by these global data-driven businesses in the current challenging economic context caused by the global pandemic? What can be done to address concerns around companies having to opt for data localizations practices in light of uncertainties surrounding EU-US Data transfers? Which options exist for the Biden Administration to pave the way towards a deal for a new transatlantic framework, and what can be learned from the Safe Harbour and Privacy Shield failures to avoid a ‘’Schrems III’’ contest at the CJEU? To which extent the enactment of a Federal privacy law could accelerate and positively impact negotiations? With concerns around US government surveillance being at the heart of the invalidation of the previous mechanisms, to which extent improved law enforcement cooperation to access electronic evidence and transparency should be the focus of the negotiations? Could International Codes of Conduct between the US, the EU and like-minded countries sharing the same values provide a strong enough alternative to top- down regulations? To which extent will the creation of the EU-U.S. Trade and Technology Council support the development of interoperable digital regulations?

Part 1: High Level Discussion
Part 1: High Level Discussion image
Didier Reynders
European Commissioner for Justice
Part 2: Reactions and panel discussion
Part 2: Reactions and panel discussion image
Katitza Rodriguez
Policy Director for Global Privacy, EFF
Part 2: Reactions and panel discussion image
Paula Bruening
Founder and Principal, Casentino Strategies LLC
12:10 - 13:00
Lunch
13:00 - 13:15
Afternoon Keynote Speech
13:15 - 14:45
Session 3: Fuelling AI with data: addressing the privacy and civil rights challenges

As AI systems are becoming omni-present in our lives, and at a time where the ethics surrounding the technology and its applications – especially facial recognition – are receiving a lot of attention, it is crucial that these systems are properly trained and that the challenges around privacy and civil liberties are appropriately addressed. The socio-economic benefits that AI can deliver by turning personal data into actionable insights can only be fully leveraged if the necessary technological and regulatory tools are in place to mitigate possible flawed or harmful results caused by algorithmic bias. This session will discuss the need for a regulatory framework ensuring that developments around AI and data are framed by ethical and privacy principles, and analyze how stakeholders can continue to work together to maximize the value brought by algorithmic decisionmaking based on personal data, both for business purposes and the public good, while combatting potential harmful threats. It will explore issues around transparency, liability and accountability to find a pathway towards greater fairness in AI and emerging technologies, and will analyze how AI itself can be used as a privacy tool.

What future possibilities will emerge if the power of AI is fostered appropriately and responsibly in the US, and how can new business models be built on this? How can businesses prepare now for future requirements to protect data collected for and generated by artificial intelligence algorithms? How can it be ensured that regulations regarding personal data don’t make it more difficult for companies to gather data to train AI systems accurately enough to ensure fairness in predictive decision-making? How can it be guaranteed that personal and sensitive data isn’t used in the wrong context which could potentially lead to harmful outcomes for the data subject? How can algorithmic accountability be concretely enforced? What new privacy concerns relating to the interdependence between AI applications, IoT and 5G have emerged and what are the technological solutions to address these? How is AI being used for data protection, security and anonymization? What role can synthetic data play to safely maximize the power of personal data? What can be learnt from sectors that are already using synthetic data to accelerate learning and decision making through AI? What role will the new the National AI Initiative Office play in orchestrating responsible and ethical AI developments? To what extent could Federal Privacy rules help enhance the US competitiveness in AI, with China ramping up efforts in this area, and the EU’s attempting to create a “third way” on artificial intelligence regulation, as the global race for AI continues?

14:45 - 15:00
Coffee Break
15:00 - 15:15
Keynote Speech
15:15 - 16:30
Session 4: Data Privacy, AdTech, and implications for a fair, trustworthy, competitive and innovative digital ecosystem

The AdTech industry and digital platforms are under intense scrutiny. The role they play in enabling users’ experiences of the digital space is key, with many free digital services enjoyed by consumers relying on advertising revenues to exist and function. Data is at the heart of this business model, representing a critical source of insights on user behaviors, habits and preferences and enabling advertisers and publishers to deliver highly-personalized products, services and content, improve their offerings, better engage with their target audience and as a result, significantly boost usage and revenues. However, the collection, sharing, analysis and use of data to build detailed profiles for micro-targeting purposes, used in both commercial and political contexts, present many challenges with respect to privacy, consumer protection as well as the very functioning of our democracies. Without clear rules to establish data protection obligations, transparency and accountability requirements, some digital advertising practices have become more and more invasive and opaque and have indirectly enabled the spread of disinformation and harmful online content, leading to an overall erosion of trust in the online ecosystem. Some major tech companies have now taken steps to address the privacy challenges around the collection of data for targeted ad purposes which will impact the entire digital advertising supply chain and therefore raises important questions linking privacy with competition issues, and highlight the importance for policymakers, at state and federal level, to get the rules governing online advertising right to create a framework mitigating risks while encouraging innovation and fair competition.

This session will focus on the relationship between privacy, user trust, targeted advertising and future AdTech business models. Addressing issues around profiling practices, micro-targeted commercial and political advertising, it will debate the extent to which the benefits of personalization and convenience can truly coexists with transparency and privacy and ask what the digital space may look like in the future, following self-regulations measures announced by major industry players. The discussion will also explore privacy-enhancing technologies that can be integrated into advertising practices, what can be done to incentivize privacy-friendly alternatives to behavioral advertising and what can be learned from marketers who have chosen to embrace these and succeeded in developing more transparent and tailored marketing approaches. Zooming out from the core data protections issues at stake, this session will also explore the extent to which talks around privacy in the context of digital advertising may inform the discussions being held at both states and federal level around competition and antitrust issues, around platform liability up to the possible reform of Section 230. Ultimately, speakers will discuss how all stakeholders can work together to bolster privacy-friendly and sustainable digital business models based on transparency, accountability fairness, and real value exchange.

Session 4: Data Privacy, AdTech, and implications for a fair, trustworthy, competitive and  innovative digital ecosystem image
Lourdes M. Turrecha
Founder, The Rise of Privacy Tech
Session 4: Data Privacy, AdTech, and implications for a fair, trustworthy, competitive and  innovative digital ecosystem image
Christine Bannan
Policy Counsel, Open Technology Institute, New America
16:30 - 16:45
Closing Keynote Speech
Select date to see events.

Sponsorship opportunities

Given the ability to transition to a ‘hybrid’ format for this event, our packages have been designed to enable sponsors to take advantage of the enhanced face-to-face networking benefits that are made possible by a physical meeting environment, whilst also benefiting from the additional exposure and outreach that virtual events offer in terms of larger audience numbers.

To discuss sponsorship and visibility opportunities at the 2021 Data Privacy Conference USA, please contact Anne-Lise Simon on dataprivacyusa@forum-europe.com / +44 (0) 2920 783 023

  • Exclusive speaking positions | Your organisation can contribute to the discussion, either in person or remotely
  • Engaging and Interactive format | Engage in a fully immersive and interactive debate with decision makers, businesses and policymakers, either onsite or online
  • US and global outreach | Convey your message to a broad and international audience
  • Networking opportunities | Socially distanced and safe networking opportunities will be available to all in person attendees throughout the day. Both in person and virtual attendees will be able to connect using our App’s virtual networking feature. Virtual private meeting rooms can also be booked.
  • Visibility Opportunities | Ensure maximum visibility through branding on the event website and marketing activities
  • Exhibition and demos area | Showcase your products and solutions or share a position paper with the audience at both onsite & digital exhibition booths
Orange tick

Exclusive speaking positions | Your organisation can contribute to the discussion, either in person or remotely

Orange tick

Engaging and Interactive format | Engage in a fully immersive and interactive debate with decision makers, businesses and policymakers, either onsite or online

Orange tick

US and global outreach | Convey your message to a broad and international audience

Orange tick

Networking opportunities | Socially distanced and safe networking opportunities will be available to all in person attendees throughout the day. Both in person and virtual attendees will be able to connect using our App’s virtual networking feature. Virtual private meeting rooms can also be booked.

Orange tick

Visibility Opportunities | Ensure maximum visibility through branding on the event website and marketing activities

Orange tick

Exhibition and demos area | Showcase your products and solutions or share a position paper with the audience at both onsite & digital exhibition booths

Sponsors & Partners:

Sponsor
ACT | The App Association represents more than 5,000 app makers and connected device companies in the mobile economy. Organization members leverage the connectivity of smart devices to create innovative solutions that make our lives better. The App Association is the leading industry resource on market strategy, regulated industries, privacy, and security.
Knowledge Partner
The Providence Group advises companies and organizations globally on how to manage enterprise-wide cybersecurity risks and we provide insight and counsel into the complex and changing cybersecurity regulatory, reputation and threat environment.
Partner
Encompass is an online magazine delivering comment, opinion and analysis on the affairs of the European Union and Europe’s place in the world. We aim to demystify the complexity of the EU and to be lively and provocative. Encompass is also a space with podcast interviews and, through Encompass Live, political and cultural events. As our name indicates we will strive to be open and accessible.

Venue:

National Press Club, 529 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20045
Get directions from Google Maps here.

Virtual Event Platform:

This event will be taking place using Forum Global’s virtual event platform. For more details please visit forum-europe.com.

Contact:

For more information on any aspect of this event, please contact Anne-Lise Simon using any of the details below.

Anne-Lise Simon
Director | Head of Event Planning & Coordination
Forum Global
dataprivacyusa@forum-europe.com
Tel: +44 (0) 2920 783 023

#DataUSA21